Early money coming for McGregor and it might not stop

By The Rex Factor

Let the hype begin.

Conor McGregor and Floyd Mayweather will step into the ring at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas on Aug. 26, and the hype will end around the same time the disappointment begins. Yet don't bother telling the early bettors that. All of the money is coming in on McGregor and that might not stop, right up to the fight.

Mayweather has not fought since September of 2015, a nearly two year absence. Boxing has such a lack of star-power throughout most divisions at the moment that the unbeaten Mayweather will be gunning for his 50th win as a professional, yet is still likely considered the best pound-for-pound fighter despite his recent inactivity, which he has played as a charade for retirement for many months.

Perhaps the one thing up for debate is whether Pretty Boy Floyd will stop the mouthy Irishman, or simply win by decision, which he has done 23 times as a pro. The props for this fight could be the most interesting betting option for those who have a strong opinion on how the fight will finish but don't like laying big numbers.

Each fighter will make more than $100 million, which is why this fight is happening. In Mayweather's 19-year pro career he has zero losses and has touched the canvas one time as a pro. McGregor's first time boxing was at age 12 but he has never been in a pro fight.

McGregor is the UFC's biggest draw, so there is little doubt that the pay-per-view numbers could smash all existing records. He held two UFC belts briefly after beating Eddie Alvarez at UFC 205. With pay-per-view buys that could be in the 2.5 to 3 million range, each fighter is going to make a pile of cash that neither could make against anyone else.

Mayweather should rarely, if ever get touched – he never had problems with Manny Pacquiao or Andre Berto in recent fights, and those are two of the top boxers of the last decade, each multiple title winners.

Conor would have to catch him clean in the jaw, or the fix would somehow have to be in.

Why would a guy who can break Rocky Marciano's record and get to 50-0, one who has earned $1.3 BILLION in the ring, possibly participate in a rigged fight? What would he have to gain?

ScoresandStats.com senior writer, Charles Jay, has been around boxing almost his entire life. See a boxer’s side of the Mayweather vs. McGregor bout.

This is a gross mismatch.

The media will try to hype the fight with a predictable narrative: McGregor's striking ability, youth and unpredictability as a southpaw could give the ring-rusty Mayweather issues. He's 40, a full 12 years older than Conor.

MMA rules do not apply here, despite how tough McGregor is. Written in the contract is a severe financial penalty to McGregor if he resorts to any tactics not allowed in boxing. This is a squared circle, and not an octagon. The analogy works just the same as if you put Michael Phelps and Usain Bolt on a track, rather than in a swimming pool. Yes, there will be a race. But no, it won't be competitive.

Somehow, the line doesn't reflect that. Mayweather is laying less than 7-to-1 when he should be at least 70-to-1, and that's being kind.

I'll be saving every penny I can to unload it at the right time on Mayweather to win when the two climb inside the ropes on Aug. 26.

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