Bryan Murray, a former NHL coach and general manager with five different teams in his career, died of colon cancer on Saturday. He was 74.

NHL commissioner Gary Bettman released a statement on Murray's passing.

"Bryan Murray's strength and character were reflected in the teams he coached and the teams he built over decades of front office excellence," Bettman said. "While his warmth and dry sense of humor were always evident, they were accompanied by the fiery competitiveness and determination that were his trademarks.

"As we mourn Bryan's passing, we celebrate his many contributions to the game -- as well as his courage. The National Hockey League family sends our deepest condolences, comfort and support to Bryan's family, his many friends and all whose lives he influenced."

Murray was general manager of the Detroit Red Wings (1990-94), Florida Panthers (1994-98), Anaheim Ducks (2002-04) and Ottawa Senators (2007-16), and coached the Washington Capitals (1981-90), Red Wings (1990-93), Panthers (1997-98), Ducks (2001-02) and Senators (2005-08).

Murray was a 620-465-23 coaching record with 131 ties in 17 NHL seasons. He won the Jack Adams Award as coach of the year with the Capitals in 1983-84, guiding them to a 48-27-5 record.

Most recently, Murray served as a special adviser to Senators general manager Pierre Dorion after stepping down as Ottawa GM in April 2016 to focus on his health and to spend time with his family. He was inducted into the Senators Ring of Honor on Jan. 24.

"Bryan was one of the greatest men that the game of hockey has ever known and also a great father, mentor and teacher," Senators owner Eugene Melnyk told the team's website. "We extend our sincere condolences to his wife, Geri, daughters, Heide and Brittany and the entire Murray family on their loss."

Murray was general of the Ducks when they reached the Stanley Cup Finals in 2003 and the franchise remembered him on Saturday.

"As both head coach and general manager of the team (2001-2004), Bryan led our organization with class, dignity and charisma," the team said in a statement. "He won 620 games as an NHL head coach and led three teams to the Stanley Cup Final, including 2003, when he served as the architect of our amazing run. But Bryan's legacy goes far beyond his success on the ice, including his courageous fight with cancer and countless contributions to the communities he served. He will be forever remembered by all he touched."