Detroit Pistons
NBA | National Basketball Association

Detroit Pistons LINEAS, ODDS, PICKS AND PRONOSTICOS

Detroit Pistons PROXIMOS | ULTIMOS PARTIDOS

Past 10 meetings

W 40% (4) L 60% (6)
  • Pistons @ 76ers 106-118 L
  • Bucks @ Pistons 131-101 L
  • Mavericks @ Pistons 131-113 L
  • Pistons @ Pacers 121-117 W
  • Pistons @ Thunder 110-101 W
  • 76ers @ Pistons 94-102 W
  • Pistons @ Nets 123-130 L
  • Knicks @ Pistons 104-102 L
  • Wizards @ Pistons 100-97 L
  • Hawks @ Pistons 101-122 W

Detroit Pistons DRAFT

Temporada Jugador Ronda General Posicion Escuela | Equipo
2022-2023 5 Round 1 Jaden Ivey G Purdue
2022-2023 16 Round 2 Ismael Kamagate C Paris
2021-2022 1 Round 1 Cade Cunningham PG Oklahoma State
2021-2022 7 Round 2 JT Thor PF Auburn
2021-2022 12 Round 2 Isaiah Livers PF Michigan
2021-2022 22 Round 2 Luka Garza C Iowa
2020-2021 7 Round 1 Killian Hayes PG Ratiopharm (Germany)
2019-2020 15 Round 1 Sekou Doumbouya PF Limoges (France)
2019-2020 15 Round 2 Isaiah Roby PF Nebraska
2018-2019 12 Round 2 Bruce Brown SG Miami
2017-2018 12 Round 1 Luke Kennard SG Duke
2016-2017 18 Round 1 Henry Ellenson PF Marquette
2016-2017 19 Round 2 Michael Gbinije SG Syracuse
2015-2016 8 Round 1 Stanley Johnson SF Arizona
2015-2016 8 Round 2 Darrun Hilliard SG Villanova
2014-2015 8 Round 2 Spencer Dinwiddie PG Colorado
2013-2014 8 Round 1 Kentavious Caldwell-Pope SG Georgia
2013-2014 7 Round 2 Tony Mitchell SG North Texas
2013-2014 26 Round 2 Peyton Siva PG Louisville
2012-2013 9 1 Andre Drummond C Connecticut
2012-2013 9 2 Khris Middleton F Texas A&M
2012-2013 14 2 Kim English G Missouri
2011-2012 8 1 Brandon Knight G Kentucky
2011-2012 3 2 Kyle Singler F Duke
2011-2012 22 2 Vernon Macklin C Florida
2010-2011 7 1 Greg Monroe F Georgetown
2010-2011 6 2 Terrico White G Mississippi
2009-2010 15 1 Austin Daye F Gonzaga
2009-2010 5 2 DaJuan Summers C Georgetown
2009-2010 14 2 Chase Budinger F Arizona

Detroit Pistons LESIONES

Sin Informacion

How is the Detroit Pistons' History?

The Detroit Pistons are a basketball club based in Detroit, Michigan. The Pistons are a member of the National Basketball Association (NBAEastern )'s Conference Central Division and play their home games at Little Caesars Arena in Midtown Detroit.

 

The Pistons were formed in Fort Wayne, Indiana, as a semi-professional team called the Fort Wayne Zollner Pistons in 1937. They became professional members of the National Basketball League (NBL) in 1941, winning two NBL titles: 1944 and 1945. The Pistons joined the Basketball Association of America in 1948. (BAA).

 

The NBL and BAA merged to become the NBA in 1949, and the Pistons were admitted to the league.  In 1957, the franchise relocated to Detroit. The Pistons have won three NBA titles: in 1989, 1990, and 2004.

 

How Were the Detroit Pistons Founded?

 

The Pistons are a professional basketball team based in Fort Wayne, Indiana. The franchise was founded in 1937 in Fort Wayne, Indiana, under the ownership of Fred Zollner. The team's name came from Zollner's company: the Fort Wayne Pistons. He named his team after it because they produced pistons for automobiles. The basketball club was founded in 1949 and joined the NBA, playing in the Central Division with Rochester, Minneapolis, Chicago, and St. Louis.

 

The Fort Wayne Pistons made it to the NBA Finals twice in the 1950s but didn't win a championship. Zollner felt his squad couldn't compete in a small market town, so he announced that the Pistons would relocate to Detroit, Michigan, in 1957.

 

Because it maintained the city's automobile culture, Zollner kept the Pistons name. The Pistons played in the Olympia Stadium for their first four seasons in Detroit before moving to Cobo Arena in 1961. The Pistons struggled throughout the late 1950s and 1960s. Still, several excellent players became all-stars, including Dave DeBusschere, Dave Bing, and Bob Lanier.

 

In 1974, Zollner sold the Pistons to Bill Davidson for $6 million. In 1978, the team moved to the Pontiac Silverdome. During the final years of the 1970s, they didn't perform well. In 1981, Isiah Thomas was chosen in the first round of the NBA draft and played for 13 seasons with the Detroit Pistons. In 1983, the Pistons hired Daly as head coach, and he remained in charge for nine seasons.

 

In 1988, the Pistons moved back to the Palace of Auburn Hills. The team adopted a hard and physical style of play, earning them the moniker "The Bad Boys" in basketball. The team's point guard was Isiah Thomas, who played alongside Joe Dumars, Bill Laimbeer, Rick Mahorn, Dennis Rodman, Adrian Dantley, Mark Aguirre, and the rest of the squad. In 1989 and 1990, the Boston Celtics became back-to-back champions by topping the Los Angeles Lakers and Portland Trail Blazers.

 

The team went from good to terrible during the 1990s, when George and Dumars were gone. Although the Pistons selected Grant Hill and other top players, they were unable to recapture their glory days of the 1980s. The Detroit Pistons traded Grant Hill to the Orlando Magic in 2000. The Pistons acquired Ben Wallace, who was virtually unknown at the time. 

 

After two years, they were back on top, winning again, making it to the Eastern Conference Finals for six consecutive seasons, a franchise-best. The Pistons made it to the NBA Finals two times in that same period, with a starting line-up of Richard Hamilton, Chauncey Billups, Rasheed Wallace, Ben Wallace, and Tayshaun Prince winning the championship in 2004.

 

In 2017, the Detroit Pistons relocated to Little Caesars Arena, joining the Detroit Red Wings for the first time since Olympia Stadium.

How is the Detroit Pistons' Isiah Thomas Era?

During the Pistons' first two championships, Isiah Thomas was the greatest player and is still the franchise's best player. He was one of the finest players to play the position and was inducted into the Hall of Fame.

 

Isiah Thomas played all 13 of his NBA seasons with the Pistons, and he was a 12-time All-Star. He was also named to five All-NBA teams. In the 1989 postseason, he averaged 18.2 points, 8.3 assists, 4.3 rebounds, and 1.6 steals per game. In 1990, he was even more spectacular, putting up 20.5 points, 8.2 assists, 5.5 rebounds, and 2.2 steals on average.

 

His name is etched in the all-time record book for them. He holds numerous records, including points (18,822), assists (9,061), and steals (1,861). He's in the top 10 for scoring average games played, three-pointers made, and rebounds.

How is the Detroit Pistons Joe Dumars Era?

Joe Dumars was part of one of the NBA's most potent backcourts, leading the Pistons to two consecutive championships. He averaged at least 17 points and four assists each postseason during their championship runs. In his 112 career playoff games, he averaged 15.6 points and 4.6 assists per game.

 

His tremendous effort on the court, combined with his tenacity as a player and strong work ethic, made him one of the greatest players in team history. His name is plastered all over their record books. He holds the franchise records for three-point shooting, points, and assists.

 

Dumars is a Hall of Famer, the architect of the 2004 champions, a six-time All-Star, and he has been named to five All-NBA Defensive squads. He's one of the Pistons' greatest players ever.

How are the Detroit Pistons Ben Wallace Era?

When Ben Wallace was traded to the Detroit Pistons from the Orlando Magic in 2000 (along with Chucky Atkins), little was expected of him. However, during his first six years in Detroit, he established himself as the NBA's top interior defender.

 

During that stretch, he won four Defensive Player of the Year honors (2002, 2003, 2005, and 2006), made five All-NBA teams, and appeared in four All-Star games. He twice led the league in rebounds (2001 and 2003), blocks (2002), and defensive win shares (2002-05).

 

His interior defense was particularly important to the Pistons' 2004 championship run when he averaged 14.3 rebounds, 2.4 blocks, and 1.9 steals in the postseason, and opponents scored just 84 points per 100 possessions when he was on the court, four better than any other Piston. 

 

He spent a year in Israel before retiring, but he came back to Detroit for the final three seasons of his professional career, albeit as a shadow of his former self. He is currently the Pistons' all-time leader in rejections, third in rebounding, and second in steals.

 

Wallace personified the Pistons' motto, "Play with heart and hustle," playing defense with strength, effort, and toughness. He is one of the greatest Pistons to have played for the franchise.

What are the Symbols of Detroit Pistons?

The symbol of Detroit Pistons is represented by a basketball. The Detroit Pistons logo represents the organization's passion for what it does and its history. Basketball has been a part of the team's past since its inception, and the use of blue, white, and red in logos dates back to 1957.

What is the Detroit Pistons Logo?

The Detroit Pistons logo consists of a basketball-shaped graphic with the team name on it. In Detroit, Michigan, the basketball franchise had kept its visual identity virtually the same since 1957, when the first circular badge was created. Despite the fact that the emblem's early versions were very distinct.

 

In 1941, the Fort Wayne Zollverein Pistons organization received its first logo. A humorous gray and black "mechanic" man with a brown basketball wore a strong red letter "Z" on his chest, appearing like a comics hero. There was just a ball and sneakers, no letters or frames.

 

In 1948, the logo was redesigned in a new white and red color scheme. The image of an automobile-part vendor became more energetic and enjoyable, implying enthusiasm for basketball. This logo has been with the club since it moved to Michigan.

 

The new logo was published in 1957 after the name of the club was changed from Fort Wayne Zollner Pistons to Detroit Pistons. It was a simple, light circular badge with white lettering inside a blue basketball. The phrase "Basketball Club" was typed in red text below the main logo, using a basic Sans-serif typeface.

 

In 1971, the last line of the emblem's lettering was deleted from the logo, making it more professional and cleaner. It was the italicized "National Basketball Association" in dark blue. It was removed, and everything else stayed in its place until 1975.

 

In 1975, the color scheme of the logo was changed to blue, white, and light brown. The highlighted letters are already firm, and the "Basketball Club" line has been replaced with "NBA," done in the same manner but with smaller letters. The shade of blue became somewhat lighter, which was only visible in the logo's highlighted frame.

 

The team first used the logo we all recognize today in 1979. It was a similar circular design with minor changes, including a brighter color palette and clearer lines. The red basketball now sits within a thick blue border, with white details added and a revised "Detroit Pistons" inscription in a more modern Sans-serif typeface.

 

In 1996, the logo had a new composition: it was a black horse placed above the stylized "Pistons" inscription in a beautiful custom typeface with elongated lines and the fire on their ends. The club's visual identity utilized subdued turquoise, crimson, white, and faint yellow accents.

 

In 2001, the logo image was unaltered, but the color palette changed. The new primary colors of the visual identity for the Detroit Pistons were red, blue, and white again in 2001. A somewhat visible light gray stripe could be seen horizontally across the letters.

 

In 2005, the iconic basketball logo was reintroduced. Despite using the same blue, red, and white color scheme as previous versions, it appeared somewhat different because there were more white lines on its crimson body. The custom typeface inscription that reads "Pistons" was enlarged and arched on the ball in white with a deep blue outline.

 

The original club logo from 1979 was resurrected in 2017. The only difference was the typeface of the white wordmark, which now featured smoother and sharper shapes of its Sans-serif letters, which appeared to be more progressive and powerful than ever before.

How is the Detroit Pistons Uniform?

The Detroit Pistons uniform has an accented blue and red color theme. 

 

For over two decades, the Pistons' jersey stayed substantially intact, with the lettering "Pistons" in blue block letters and lightning bolts on the flanks. In the 1978–79 season, the team wore a uniform with lightning bolts on the sides and the wordmark on the front of the jerseys.

 

In 1981, the Pistons switched back to its basic block lettering and simple side panel design, maintained until 1996. In 1997, the Pistons adopted teal, black, yellow, and red as team colors and unveiled a revised logo with a horse's head and fiery mane.

 

This color combination lasted until 2001. The team reverted to the classic red, white, and blue hues and a uniform design inspired by the 1981–96 threads. The horse's head and flame mane emblem remained in use until 2005 when the team adopted a more traditional logo style.

 

On August 14, 2013, the team unveiled a navy blue and red version of their classic uniform. It included the words "Motor City" on the front. The Pistons' first alternate design was since they wore a red alternate from 2005 to 2009, which was essentially a recolored version of their regular road attire.

 

The design of the new uniform is unique, intended to represent pride and character in metro Detroit while also paying homage to the region's vehicle history. According to the team's press release, it "collaborated with Adidas and the NBA in designing the uniforms."

 

The jersey's writing and numbering style are the same as the team's existing home and away kits. Lettering and numbers on the jerseys and pants are white with hair-line red and blue trim to set off the navy blue and red accents. The back of the jersey features a wing, which also serves as a symbol for the club.

 

This is very similar to the primary home and away uniforms, with only minor font size and placement changes. The secondary logo is on the shorts - just like the primary home and away kits.

 

On October 4, 2015, the Detroit Pistons unveiled a new alternate pride uniform for the upcoming season. The design of the Detroit Chrome uniforms was inspired by "the desire to pay homage to our finest vehicles from the past, as well as automobiles of tomorrow," according to the team.

 

The world's largest auto assembly plant is located in Detroit, and it has a long history of producing luxury automobiles. With a matte chrome base color and clean, uncomplicated lines, the uniform design is inspired by the historic muscle automobiles that have screamed up and down Woodward Avenue for decades. The navy trim and the word Detroit imprinted on the chest signify the blue-collar work ethic that established the car industry and area.

What are the Detroit Pistons' Colors?

The Detroit Pistons’  colors consist of royal blue, red, chrome, navy blue, and white. The main Detroit Pistons logo includes all of them except for navy blue, while the letter "P" symbol does not have any chrome pieces.

 

The table below shows the color specificity of the Detroit Pistons:

 

Color

Hex Color

RGB

CMYK

Pantone

Red

#C8102E

(200,16,46)

(2,100,85,6)

186

Royal

#1D42BA

(29,66,138)

(100,78,0,18)

7687

Gray

#BEC0C2

(181,179,179)

(30,25,25,0)

PMS COOL GRAY 5

Navy

#002D62

(0,45,98)

(100,68,0,54)

PMS 282

 

Who are the Detroit Pistons' Players?

Cade Cunningham of the University of Detroit Mercy was this year's top pick. Cade, a 6-foot-8 point guard, will aim to change the culture in Detroit, which hasn't been solid since the mid-2000s. Last season, Jeremi Grant finished second to clear front-runner Julius Randle for KIA's Most Improved Player award. 

 

The Pistons have a few things going in their favor. However, it will be a few years before they are competitive again. Alongside Grant and Cunningham will be Saddiq Bey, Killian Hayes, Josh Jackson, Cory Joseph, and Kelly Olynyk. The opening lineup should include Cade Cunningham, Saddiq Bey, Jerami Grant, Isaiah Stewart, and Cory Joseph. 

 

The table below shows the Detroit Pistons' depth chart:



 

STARTER

2ND

3RD

4TH

5TH

 

PG

Cory Joseph O

Killian Hayes

Saben Lee

Cade Cunningham

Frank Jackson

 

SG

Cade Cunningham

Frank Jackson

Cory Joseph O

Rodney McGruder

Hamidou Diallo O

 

SF

Saddiq Bey

Hamidou Diallo O

Rodney McGruder

Isaiah Livers

Cade Cunningham

 

PF

Jerami Grant O

Marvin Bagley III O

Isaiah Livers

Braxton Key

Kelly Olynyk

 

C

Isaiah Stewart

Kelly Olynyk

Marvin Bagley III O

Luka Garza

   

 

Cade Cunningham was selected first overall in the 2021 NBA draft by the Detroit Pistons. He made his debut in the 2021 NBA Summer League on August 8, 2021, in a 76–72 win over the Oklahoma City Thunder, recording 12 points, six rebounds and two assists in 26 minutes.

 

Cunningham missed the entire training camp, part of the preseason, and five of Detroit's first six games due to an ankle problem. On October 30, he made his NBA debut, scoring two points and dishing out two assists while gathering seven rebounds in a 110–103 victory over the Orlando Magic.

 

After five games, Cunningham notched his first 40 percent or better field-goal percentage and a 18-point, 10-rebound double-double in his third NBA contest. 

 

On November 15, at 20 years and 51 days old, Cunningham became the youngest player in league history to accomplish 25 points, eight rebounds, and eight assists while making five three-pointers in a game. He had a 13-point, 12-rebound, and 10-assist triple double in a 121-116 loss to the Los Angeles Lakers on November 21 to become the eighth youngest player in NBA history with a triple double and the Pistons' first since Isiah Thomas did it.

How did Tom Gores' Ownership Affect the Detroit Pistons?

Platinum Equity Chairman and CEO, Tom Gores is a Michigan State University graduate who was born in Flint to parents with deep ties there. He currently owns the Detroit Pistons as well an international investment firm that has grown significantly under his leadership over decades-long career leading up until now. 

 

The Gores family have a long history in the area and are both active community members. Both are strongly engaged in the local community. Holly is from Michigan and has ties to the region that stretch back many decades. With the power to connect and inspire people throughout Michigan, Gores has said that the Pistons are a "community asset."

 

In 2017, Gores relocated the Pistons to downtown Detroit, and in 2019, he constructed the Henry Ford Detroit Pistons Performance Center, a cutting-edge practice facility and corporate headquarters. The Pistons will play their inaugural season at the new Wayne State Arena on the campus of Wayne State University, which will also serve as a home to the Motor City Cruise and NBA G League in 2018. 

 

The partnership and activation of three new basketball facilities have resulted in more investment and economic activity in the city and a comprehensive community benefits package that assists Detroit's neighborhoods.



Who are the Rivals of Detroit Pistons?

 

The main rival of the Detroit Pistons is the Chicago Bulls. The Chicago Bulls and Detroit Pistons have a long history of competing against each other in the National Basketball Association. The rivalry began in the late 1980s and was one of the fiercest in league history for a few years when Michael Jordan transformed into one of the NBA's best players. The Pistons established themselves as postseason contenders. 

 

The Twin Cities are located along the border between Minnesota and Wisconsin, as well as a 20-mile stretch of I-94 that runs through it. They are the state's two biggest metropolises and are only separated by a 280-mile length of road, the majority of which is covered by I-94. 

 

The rivalry between the Blackhawks and Red Wings is also fueled by a geographic battle between Chicago and Detroit, which is mirrored in Major League Baseball's White Sox vs. Tigers rivalry, the National Football League's Bears vs. Lions drama, and the National Hockey League's Blackhawks vs. Red Wings animosity.

 

The Shooting Stars Competition, which took place during the 2007 NBA All-Star Weekend, pitted the two teams against one another. Chicago (Ben Gordon, Candice Dupree, Scottie Pippen) and Detroit (Chauncey Billups, Swin Cash, Bill Laimbeer) both advanced to the Finals. 

 

The Bulls were eliminated owing to Gordon's mistake, which allowed the Pistons to win by default. "Deeeeee-troit Basket-ball!" Mason yelled out as the three, Billups, Cash, and Laimbeer celebrated. Mason made an announcement at the Thomas & Mack Center during the 2007 NBA All-Star Weekend games and activities.

How is the Detroit Pistons' season-by-season record?

 

The table below shows the Detroit Pistons' season-by-season record:

Season

Lg

Team

W

L

W/L%

Finish

SRS

 

Pace

Rel Pace

ORtg

Rel ORtg

DRtg

Rel DRtg

 

Playoffs

Coaches

Top WS

2021-22

NBA

Detroit Pistons

23

59

.280

5th of 5

-7.36

 

98.4

0.2

106.0

-6.0

113.8

1.8

   

D. Casey (23-59)

S. Bey (4.0)

2020-21

NBA

Detroit Pistons

20

52

.278

5th of 5

-4.38

 

97.9

-1.3

108.0

-4.3

112.5

0.2

   

D. Casey (20-52)

M. Plumlee (5.1)

2019-20

NBA

Detroit Pistons

20

46

.303

4th of 5

-4.38

 

97.6

-2.7

109.0

-1.6

112.7

2.1

   

D. Casey (20-46)

C. Wood (5.1)

2018-19

NBA

Detroit Pistons*

41

41

.500

3rd of 5

-0.56

 

97.4

-2.6

109.0

-1.4

109.2

-1.2

 

Lost E. Conf. 1st Rnd.

D. Casey (41-41)

A. Drummond (10.0)

2017-18

NBA

Detroit Pistons

39

43

.476

4th of 5

-0.26

 

96.2

-1.1

107.2

-1.4

107.3

-1.3

   

S. Van Gundy (39-43)

A. Drummond (10.3)

2016-17

NBA

Detroit Pistons

37

45

.451

5th of 5

-1.29

 

95.0

-1.4

106.0

-2.8

107.1

-1.7

   

S. Van Gundy (37-45)

T. Harris (6.8)

2015-16

NBA

Detroit Pistons*

44

38

.537

3rd of 5

0.43

 

95.1

-0.7

106.1

-0.3

105.5

-0.9

 

Lost E. Conf. 1st Rnd.

S. Van Gundy (44-38)

A. Drummond (7.4)

2014-15

NBA

Detroit Pistons

32

50

.390

5th of 5

-1.39

 

92.8

-1.1

105.3

-0.3

106.4

0.8

   

S. Van Gundy (32-50)

A. Drummond (7.7)

2013-14

NBA

Detroit Pistons

29

53

.354

4th of 5

-4.13

 

94.9

1.0

105.9

-0.8

109.7

3.0

   

M. Cheeks (21-29), J. Loyer (8-24)

A. Drummond (9.9)

2012-13

NBA

Detroit Pistons

29

53

.354

4th of 5

-4.33

 

90.8

-1.2

103.8

-2.1

108.1

2.2

   

L. Frank (29-53)

G. Monroe (5.9)

2011-12

NBA

Detroit Pistons

25

41

.379

4th of 5

-5.19

 

89.2

-2.1

101.0

-3.6

106.3

1.7

   

L. Frank (25-41)

G. Monroe (7.0)

2010-11

NBA

Detroit Pistons

30

52

.366

4th of 5

-3.78

 

89.2

-2.9

107.7

0.4

111.7

4.4

   

J. Kuester (30-52)

G. Monroe (6.6)

2009-10

NBA

Detroit Pistons

27

55

.329

5th of 5

-5.02

 

88.5

-4.2

105.6

-2.0

111.4

3.8

   

J. Kuester (27-55)

B. Wallace (4.7)

2008-09

NBA

Detroit Pistons*

39

43

.476

3rd of 5

-0.36

 

86.7

-5.0

107.4

-0.9

108.0

-0.3

 

Lost E. Conf. 1st Rnd.

M. Curry (39-43)

T. Prince (6.2)

2007-08

NBA

Detroit Pistons*

59

23

.720

1st of 5

6.67

 

87.3

-5.1

111.4

3.9

102.9

-4.6

 

Lost E. Conf. Finals

F. Saunders (59-23)

C. Billups (13.5)

2006-07

NBA

Detroit Pistons*

53

29

.646

1st of 5

3.69

 

87.3

-4.6

108.9

2.4

104.2

-2.3

 

Lost E. Conf. Finals

F. Saunders (53-29)

C. Billups (11.4)

2005-06

NBA

Detroit Pistons*

64

18

.780

1st of 5

6.24

 

86.8

-3.7

110.8

4.6

103.1

-3.1

 

Lost E. Conf. Finals

F. Saunders (64-18)

C. Billups (15.5)

2004-05

NBA

Detroit Pistons*

54

28

.659

1st of 5

3.31

 

87.2

-3.7

105.6

-0.5

101.2

-4.9

 

Lost Finals

L. Brown (54-28)

C. Billups (12.1)

2003-04

NBA

Detroit Pistons*

54

28

.659

2nd of 8

5.04

 

87.9

-2.2

102.0

-0.9

95.4

-7.5

 

Won Finals

L. Brown (54-28)

C. Billups (11.3)

2002-03

NBA

Detroit Pistons*

50

32

.610

1st of 8

2.97

 

86.8

-4.2

104.1

0.5

99.9

-3.7

 

Lost E. Conf. Finals

R. Carlisle (50-32)

B. Wallace (10.6)

2001-02

NBA

Detroit Pistons*

50

32

.610

1st of 8

1.69

 

90.0

-0.7

104.8

0.3

102.4

-2.1

 

Lost E. Conf. Semis

R. Carlisle (50-32)

B. Wallace (11.6)

2000-01

NBA

Detroit Pistons

32

50

.390

5th of 8

-2.08

 

94.7

3.4

100.0

-3.0

101.8

-1.2

   

G. Irvine (32-50)

J. Stackhouse (9.2)

1999-00

NBA

Detroit Pistons*

42

40

.512

4th of 8

1.13

 

95.7

2.6

107.3

3.2

105.8

1.7

 

Lost E. Conf. 1st Rnd.

A. Gentry (28-30), G. Irvine (14-10)

G. Hill (10.7)

1998-99

NBA

Detroit Pistons*

29

21

.580

3rd of 8

3.97

 

86.3

-2.6

104.2

2.0

100.3

-1.9

 

Lost E. Conf. 1st Rnd.

A. Gentry (29-21)

G. Hill (7.3)

1997-98

NBA

Detroit Pistons

37

45

.451

6th of 8

1.95

 

88.2

-2.1

105.3

0.3

103.5

-1.5

   

D. Collins (21-24), A. Gentry (16-21)

G. Hill (10.2)

 

As of this writing, the Detroit Pistons have played in 74 seasons.

What are the Detroit Pistons' Championships?

The Detroit Pistons have won three NBA championships (1989, 1990, 2004).

 

The table shows the NBA 1989 Championship game summary:

 

Game

Date

Away Team

Result

Home Team

Game 1:

Tuesday, June 6

Los Angeles Lakers

97–109 (0–1)

Detroit Pistons

Game 2:

Thursday, June 8

Los Angeles Lakers

105–108 (0–2)

Detroit Pistons

Game 3:

Sunday, June 11

Detroit Pistons

114–110 (3–0)

Los Angeles Lakers

Game 4:

Tuesday, June 13

Detroit Pistons

105–97 (4–0)

Los Angeles Lakers

 

The 1989 NBA Finals was the league championship round of the 1988–89 National Basketball Association (NBA) season and the final game of the 1989 NBA Playoffs. The Pistons faced the Lakers in a rematch of last year's championship round. The Eastern Conference playoff champion Detroit Pistons faced off against the defending NBA champion and Western Conference playoff champion Los Angeles Lakers. The Pistons were the first NBA champions since 1983 to come from outside the Los Angeles Lakers and Boston Celtics.

 

The Lakers had won their division for the second time in franchise history during the season. The team swept its first three playoff series (Pacific Division opponents: Portland, Seattle, and Phoenix) before meeting the Detroit Pistons for the championship once again.

 

The Detroit Pistons had dominated the Eastern Conference for much of the season, winning 63 games. The Pistons beat the Chicago Bulls in six games to advance to the NBA Finals for a second consecutive year. The Lakers had beaten them in a tough seven-game series in the previous season.

 

The Pistons completed their four-game sweep of the injury-riddled Lakers in the Western Conference Finals, marking the first time a team (Lakers) had swept the first three rounds of the playoffs before losing in the finals. The Pistons are the first Eastern Conference club to sweep an NBA final, having completed the feat against the Golden State Warriors on Thursday. The Pistons were the only team before 2016 to win all four series on the road.




The table shows the NBA 1990 Championship game summary:

Game

Date

Away team

Result

Home team

Game 1

Tuesday, June 5

Portland Trail Blazers

99–105 (0–1)

Detroit Pistons

Game 2

Thursday, June 7

Portland Trail Blazers

106–105 (OT) (1–1)

Detroit Pistons

Game 3

Sunday, June 10

Detroit Pistons

121–106 (2–1)

Portland Trail Blazers

Game 4

Tuesday, June 12

Detroit Pistons

112–109 (3–1)

Portland Trail Blazers

Game 5

Thursday, June 14

Detroit Pistons

92–90 (4–1)

Portland Trail Blazers

The Pistons, the defending NBA champion, and Eastern Conference playoff winner, faced off against the Portland Trail Blazers, the Western Conference playoff winner. The 1900 NBA Finals was the first since 1979 to not feature either the Los Angeles Lakers or Boston Celtics. It was one of two NBA titles won by a squad other than the Chicago Bulls or Houston Rockets during the 1990s (the San Antonio Spurs took home 1999).

 

The Pistons became the third team in NBA history to win back-to-back titles, following the Lakers and Celtics.

 

The table shows the NBA 2004 Championship game summary:




Game

Date

Away Team

Result

Home Team

Game 1

Sunday, June 6

Detroit Pistons

87–75 (1–0)

Los Angeles Lakers

Game 2

Tuesday, June 8

Detroit Pistons

91–99 (OT) (1–1)

Los Angeles Lakers

Game 3

Thursday, June 10

Los Angeles Lakers

68–88 (1–2)

Detroit Pistons

Game 4

Sunday, June 13

Los Angeles Lakers

80–88 (1–3)

Detroit Pistons

Game 5

Tuesday, June 15

Los Angeles Lakers

87–100 (1–4)

Detroit Pistons

 

The Lakers had a home-court advantage, and the series was contested via a best-of-seven format.

 

The series saw the return of some of the league's all-time great players, including Shaquille O'Neal and Kobe Bryant, both of whom were playing in their final NBA Finals. Despite being heavily favored, the Lakers were upset by the Pistons in five games. The Pistons won their first NBA title since 1989–90 when they were regularly known as the Detroit Pistons. They defeated the Los Angeles Lakers in five games to win the championship, ending a 15-year drought between titles for their franchise. The Pistons, who were the underdogs in this series, dominated a Lakers squad that included four future Hall of Famers.

What Is the Average Cost for Detroit Pistons Tickets?

Ticket prices differ according to the opponent, but they are available for as low as $17 and average at $123.

Where to Buy Detroit Pistons Tickets?

The official ticketing partner of the NBA, Ticketmaster, is where you'll find the best deals on Detroit Pistons tickets. Individual game tickets or season passes are available, and there are several seating options to fit any budget. The Detroit Pistons’' official website has both the NBA League Pass and game tickets for sale.

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