New Hampshire: Finally?

Sports betting legislation for the state of New Hampshire once again appears to be on the verge of becoming law. The Senate Finance Committee held a special session recently to expedite the passage of H 480. The bill appears ready to go as it is now set for a quick stop at the house.

The Senate approved two amendments to H 480 so the bill will need to receive concurrence from the House. The bill's author, Rep. Timothy Lang, expects H 480 will get concurrence from the House in one of the next two sessions in the first or second week of June. Big news for New Hampshire sports bettors as this leaves open the possibility to be up and running sometime during the 2019-2020 football season.


Betting Like a Pro Means Thinking Like One First


It may take a few weeks but concurrence from the House looks likely as the House and Gov. Chris Sununu have already approved a budget with $10 million from sports betting included. So while it will be a wait and see couple of weeks the likelihood of approval is pretty high at this point.

How It Will Look?

New Hampshire's sports betting will be run by the states lottery commission. They will have the opportunity to conduct sports betting directly or through authorized agents they choose by creating a Division of Sports Wagering within the Lottery Commission to serve as a regulator of sorts.

A quick look at some of the main points leaves me generally thinking it will be a decent product compared to some.  One of my personal favorites I initially saw was no mandate of an "integrity fee" and no requirement to use league data. Always a big fan when someone tells the billionaires too bad.  In-play wagering will be allowed only through mobile apps and not at retail locations(See below). Mobile wagering will be allowed and probably widespread as they are allowing for remote registration for players. Not a huge loss but the state will prohibit wagering on local collegiate teams or on collegiate games happening within the state borders. So you backers of the Dartmouth Big Green will have to look elsewhere to get a few bucks on the home team. I have an odd feeling that over the years these states that are prohibiting betting on local college teams will have a change of heart. I understand the intent I just don't see it accomplishing much.

Overall, it's a good rollout compared to some(see what Illinois is trying to do).


What Is Wrong With Illinois?


One Issue

One of the final issues being dealt with is in regards to mobile betting. In-play wagering was already approved for mobile wagering but retail establishments want to be able to offer it as well. Tavern owners are concerned that drinkers and players may come to their establishment to watch the games but they want to be able to offer them the full menu of betting. So they do not have to pick up their mobile and wager on another platform. It makes sense that bar owners would want to have every opportunity afforded to mobile apps as they would be at a significant disadvantage having to offer a limited menu compared to other shops. Will be curious to see if this is addressed before release or after the pub owners begin to complain about how unfair they have it compared to mobile shops.

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