Minnesota Timberwolves
NBA | National Basketball Association

Minnesota Timberwolves LINES, ODDS, PICKS AND REVIEWS

The Minnesota Timberwolves (also referred to as the T-Wolves, or simply Wolves) are an American professional basketball team based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. They play in the Northwest Division of the Western Conference in the National Basketball Association (NBA). Founded in 1989, the team is owned by Glen Taylor. The Timberwolves played their home games between the Metrodome and the Met Center during their inaugural season, before moving to Target Center in 1990. Like most expansion teams, the Timberwolves struggled in their early years, but after the acquisition of Kevin Garnett in the 1995 NBA draft, the team made the playoffs eight consecutive times from 1997 to 2004. 

Minnesota Timberwolves NEXT AND LAST GAMES

Next meetings

  • @Portland (01-25-22) 109 - 107
  • @Portland (01-25-22) 109 - 107
  • @L.A. Clippers (10-09-22) 119 - 117
  • @Oklahoma City (10-23-22) 116 - 106

Past 10 meetings

W 60% (6) L 40% (4)
  • Timberwolves @ Jazz 118-108 W
  • Pacers @ Timberwolves 115-121 W
  • Thunder @ Timberwolves 135-128 L
  • Grizzlies @ Timberwolves 101-109 W
  • Timberwolves @ Wizards 127-142 L
  • Warriors @ Timberwolves 137-114 L
  • Timberwolves @ Hornets 108-110 L
  • Timberwolves @ Pacers 115-101 W
  • Heat @ Timberwolves 101-105 W
  • Timberwolves @ 76ers 112-109 W

Minnesota Timberwolves DRAFT

Season Player Round Overall Position School | Team
2022-2023 19 Round 1 Jake LaRavia F Wake Forest
2022-2023 10 Round 2 Bryce McGowens G Nebraska
2022-2023 18 Round 2 Kendall Brown F Baylor
2022-2023 20 Round 2 Matteo Spagnolo G Cremona
2020-2021 1 Round 1 Anthony Edwards SG Georgia
2020-2021 17 Round 1 Aleksej Pokusevski PF Olympiacos (Greece)
2020-2021 3 Round 2 Daniel Oturu PF Minnesota
2019-2020 11 Round 1 Cameron Johnson PF North Carolina
2019-2020 13 Round 2 Jaylen Nowell SG Washington
2018-2019 20 Round 1 Josh Okogie SG Georgia Tech
2018-2019 18 Round 2 Keita Bates-Diop SF Ohio State
2017-2018 7 Round 1 Lauri Markkanen PF Arizona
2016-2017 5 Round 1 Kris Dunn PG Providence
2015-2016 1 Round 1 Karl-Anthony Towns C Kentucky
2015-2016 1 Round 2 Cedi Osman SF Anadolu Efes (Turkey)
2015-2016 6 Round 2 Rakeem Christmas PF Syracuse
2014-2015 13 Round 1 Zach LaVine PG UCLA
2014-2015 10 Round 2 Glenn Robinson III SF Michigan
2014-2015 14 Round 2 Markel Brown SG Oklahoma State
2014-2015 23 Round 2 Alessandro Gentile SF EA7 Armani (Italy)
2013-2014 9 Round 1 Trey Burke PG Michigan
2013-2014 26 Round 1 Andre Roberson SF Colorado
2013-2014 22 Round 2 Lorenzo Brown PG North Carolina State
2013-2014 29 Round 2 Bojan Dubljevic PF Valencia BC (Spain)
2012-2013 28 2 Robbie Hummel F Purdue
2011-2012 2 1 Derrick Williams F Arizona
2011-2012 20 1 Donatas Motiejunas F Benetton Treviso
2010-2011 4 1 Wesley Johnson F Syracuse
2010-2011 16 1 Luke Babbitt F Nevada
2010-2011 23 1 Trevor Booker F Clemson
2010-2011 15 2 Paulo Prestes C CB Murcia
2010-2011 26 2 Hamady Ndiaye C Rutgers
2009-2010 5 1 Ricky Rubio PG DKV Jovenhut
2009-2010 6 1 Jonny Flynn G Syracuse
2009-2010 18 1 Ty Lawson G North Carolina
2009-2010 28 1 Wayne Ellington G North Carolina
2009-2010 15 2 Nick Calathes G Florida
2009-2010 17 2 Henk Norel PF DKV Joventut

Minnesota Timberwolves INJURIES

  • Juancho Hernangomez

    Ankle
    Mid Dec | out

    Hernangomez is idle with a sprained ankle, and he will remain out until the middle of December.

  • Karl-Anthony Towns

    Calf
    Mid Jan | out

    Towns is sidelined with a right calf strain, and he is expected to miss four to six weeks.

  • Jordan McLaughlin

    Calf
    Out indefinitely | out

    McLaughlin is out of commission with a left calf strain, and team officials have yet to provide an exact return date.

  • Jaden McDaniels

    Illness
    Prob Sat | probable

    McDaniels has sat out the last three contests with an illness, but it is likely that he will face the Thunder on Saturday.

  • Leandro Bolmaro

    Concussion
    Prob Wed | probable

    Bolmaro has missed the previous three games while going through the league's concussion protocol, but it is expected that he will play Wednesday against the Clippers.

How is the Minnesota Timberwolves' History?

The Minnesota Timberwolves are a professional basketball team representing the state of Minnesota in the National Basketball Association. The Minnesota Timberwolves belong to the league's Northwest Division of the Western Conference.

 

After acquiring Kevin Garnett in the first round of the 1995 NBA draft, the Timberwolves were able to begin a streak of eight consecutive seasons where they were able to qualify for the playoffs. This streak lasted from 1997 until 2004 and was typical of the early years of most expansion teams. The Timberwolves reached the Western Conference Finals in the same season they won their first division championship in 2004, even though they had failed to advance past the first round in each of their first seven playoff appearances.

 

Garnett's MVP season saw him continue to get better and eventually earn himself another award for it. After failing to make the playoffs in 2005 and trading Kevin Garnett to the Boston Celtics in 2007, the team went into the process of rebuilding, which lasted for more than a decade. 

 

After being traded back to the Timberwolves in February 2015, Garnett played out the rest of his career with Minnesota before calling it quits during the offseason of 2016. When the Minnesota Timberwolves qualified for the postseason for the first time since 2002, it marked the end of a playoff drought that lasted 14 years.

 

How Were the Minnesota Timberwolves Founded?

The Minnesota Timberwolves was founded in 1989. Glen Taylor, who also owns the Minnesota Lynx of the WNBA, is the current owner. The Target Center has been the home of the Minnesota Timberwolves ever since the team was founded in 1990. In 1967 and 1968, Minnesota fielded an American Basketball Association team known as the Minnesota Muskies, and in 1968 and 1969, the state fielded an NBA team known as the Minnesota Pipers. 

 

The franchise held a competition to decide what the team's name would be, and in December of 1986, they chose the words "Timberwolves" and "Polars" as the two finalists. After that, the team polled all 842 city councils in Minnesota to determine who should win, and the "Timberwolves" came out on top by a nearly 2:1 margin. The team's name was formalized on January 23, 1987, when it became known as simply "Minnesota Timberwolves." The greatest number of timberwolves can be found in Minnesota, which is one of the 48 contiguous states.

 

In their first game, November 3, 1989, the Timberwolves were defeated by the Seattle SuperSonics 106–94 away from home. They played their first game at home five days later, but it was a loss to the Chicago Bulls by a 96–84 at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome. 

 

The Timberwolves earned their first victory two nights later, on November 10, in front of an enthusiastic hometown crowd at home against the Philadelphia 76ers by a score of 125–118. It was an impressive win that gave fans something to be excited about next season. 

 

Tony Campbell led the Timberwolves to a 22–60 record, good for sixth place in the Midwest Division. Campbell set the pace for the Timberwolves in scoring with 23.2 points per game. The team's netting of over one million fans to the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome for home games was an NBA record. It included the 49,551 people who watched the Minnesota Timberwolves' final home game of the season, which was a loss to the Denver Nuggets by a score of 99–88 on April 17, 1990.

 

How is the Minnesota Timberwolves' Kevin Garnett Era?

 

Kevin Garnett was the first high school player to be chosen with pick fifth overall by the Minnesota Timberwolves in the 1995 NBA draft 1975. When the Timberwolves selected Garnett, he became the first high schooler to be picked that early since 1975. The Timberwolves have only been a member of the NBA since the 1989–1990 season, and they have never had a season in which they won more than 29 games. 

 

During Kevin Garnett's rookie year with the Timberwolves, the team was going through a transition. They replaced Bill Blair with Flip Saunders as head coach in the middle of the year and made a few trades simultaneously. When Garnett was a rookie, he spent most of the season coming off the bench. 

 

However, shortly after Saunders was hired as head coach, Sam Mitchell strongly recommended that Garnett be moved into the starting lineup. During the remainder of the season, he averaged 14 points, 8.4 rebounds, and 2.26 blocks in 42 games as a starter.

 

The table shows the career summary of Kevin Garnett as of the writing:

Career Summary

G

1462

PTS

17.8

TRB

10.0

AST

3.7

FG %

49.7

FG 3%

27.5

FT %

78.9

eFG %

50.1

PER

22.7

WS

191.4

 

There is no question that Kevin Garnett is the best player in the history of the Minnesota Timberwolves franchise. He is simply the best. Garnett was a fantastic player in every facet of the game, and he demonstrated this excellence every time he stepped foot on a basketball court.

 

On the defensive end of the court, he was invincible as a wall of solid defense. Garnett was able to block shots and alter many others that were beyond his reach.

How is the Minnesota Timberwolves’ Sam Cassell Era?

Sam Cassell is widely recognized as the team's de facto leader during their historic 2003–2004 NBA season. Though he was a gifted basketball player, his leadership skills made him such a standout Timberwolf. He could do anything, including scoring, passing, and defending. 

 

But it was his leadership skills that set him apart. He could rally his teammates and get them to believe in themselves and their ability to win. He was the perfect example of a leader on and off the court. Though he is no longer with the team, his legacy will continue to inspire future generations of Timberwolves.

 

After playing for the Bucks for four seasons, he was one of the players who was sent to the Minnesota Timberwolves, along with Ervin Johnson, after the 2003 NBA draft in exchange for Joe Smith and Anthony Peeler. That year, Cassell had his best season overall as an individual, and he was very successful. During the season, he averaged 19.8 points, a shooting percentage of 49 percent, 7.3 assists, and 1.3 steals per game while playing 35 minutes per contest. 

 

He was chosen for the All-NBA Second Team and was selected to play in the NBA All-Star Game in 2004. Cassell, Latrell Sprewell, and Kevin Garnett formed what was widely considered to be the best trio in the NBA during that season. 

 

The Timberwolves finished with the best record in the Western Conference, finishing with a 58–24 record. As a result, they could leapfrog Western Conference giants such as the Sacramento Kings, Dallas Mavericks, San Antonio Spurs, and Los Angeles Lakers for first place in the conference.

 

During the first game of the first round of the playoffs, which the Minnesota Timberwolves won against the Denver Nuggets, Cassell made his playoff debut with the Timberwolves and scored a franchise playoff record of 40 points.

 

The series would be over in five games, with Minnesota emerging victorious. They were pitted against the Sacramento Kings in the subsequent round, and Cassell once again scored 40 points in the first game of the series. 

 

Cassell's clutch play in the final moments of each game was a critical factor in the Timberwolves' victory over the Kings in seven games. However, Cassell suffered a back injury that prevented him from playing at his full potential in the Western Conference Finals against the Lakers, which the Lakers went on to win in six games.

 

The table shows the career summary of Sam Cassell as of the writing:

 

Career Summary

G

993

PTS

15.7

TRB

3.2

AST

6.0

FG %

45.4

FG 3%

33.1

FT %

86.1

eFG %

48.0

PER

19.5

WS

87.5

 

How is the Minnesota Timberwolves’ Al Jefferson Era?

Al Jefferson played for the Timberwolves for three seasons. In the blockbuster trade that sent Kevin Garnett, the franchise player for the Minnesota Timberwolves, to the Boston Celtics, the prized prospect sent over was Al Jefferson. 

 

The Wolves offense benefitted the most from his addition to the team. The key to Jefferson's success on the basketball court was his ability to dominate in a particular court area. He was a good scorer. He would position himself relatively close to the rim, execute his move, a spin or a hard drive, and then put the basketball through the hoop. Even though it wasn't particularly pretty by any stretch of the imagination, he was productive and regularly posted 20-point scoring nights.

 

The area of defense in which Jefferson struggled the most was in his offense. Despite this, Jefferson's offensive contributions more than made up for his deficiencies on the defensive end of the court.

 

On July 31, 2007, Jefferson was one of the players that the Minnesota Timberwolves received in exchange for Kevin Garnett. Gerald Green, Ryan Gomes, Theo Ratliff, Sebastian Telfair, and draft picks were the other players involved in the trade. As soon as he arrived in Minnesota, Jefferson wasted no time signing a significant contract extension before the start of the season. It was satisfactory at $65 million spread out over five years, but he could have gotten a maximum deal if he had tried harder. Instead, he decided not to pursue one because he felt as though he "had not proven" himself.

 

The table shows the career summary of Al Jefferson as of the writing:

Career Summary

G

915

PTS

15.7

TRB

8.4

AST

1.5

FG %

49.9

FG 3%

12.1

FT %

71.1

eFG %

49.9

PER

20.6

WS

71.0

What are the Minnesota Timberwolves' Championships?

The Minnesota Timberwolves have never won a title, but they did capture the Central Division crown in 2004. For a while, it appeared that they might make a playoff run in 2004, but they ultimately failed to do so. Still, it was an encouraging sign for a team that has struggled in recent years.

What are the Symbols of Minnesota Timberwolves?

The symbol of the Minnesota Timberwolves is a blue wolf.  Also, Crunch the Wolf is the name of the Minnesota Timberwolves mascot.

 

The new Minnesota Timberwolves club logo has gone through significant revisions, except for a few symbols that the designers chose to retain. The blue Wolf is depicted in the very center, as it has been in years past, and is shown against the backdrop of the blue ball and the green star. 

 

The figure of the Wolf is shown in profile with its mouth wide open. The grin on the animal is meant to represent the bravery and vitality that the team possesses as it works toward victory. It is essential to point out that the star's eyes are the same shade of green as the star itself; this was not a random choice. This color is reminiscent of the verdant state of Minnesota and the color of the large buds that can be found on the trees throughout this state in great quantity.

 

What is the Minnesota Timberwolves' Logo?

The first version of the Timberwolves' logo featured a basketball in gray and acid blue with a green outline and a portrait of a wolf in white and blue placed on the left side of the ball. The animal appeared graceful and had green irises in its scooper eyes. The wordmark was placed underneath the badge, with the word "Minnesota" written in a narrow and bold sans-serif typeface in a small green cursive font. The word "Timberwolves" was written in all capital letters using the same font.

 

The club was given a fresh look thanks to the improvements made in 1996. The logo, which Peter Thornburgh designed, featured a menacing image of a wolf's head with its mouth wide open, indicating that it was prepared to engage in combat. The image of the animal was superimposed on top of the forest of green trees, and a stylized word mark was placed in between them. The name of the city was in gold, while a black banner with the word "Minnesota '' written in white capital letters and a clean white outline hung above.

 

In 2008, they added a lighter shade of green to the trees, and white was added to the lettering to brighten the overall color palette of the emblem. The new wordmark was designed using a serif typeface that is bold and elegant. The designers positioned all of the capital letters near one another, and the double blue and black outlines were glued.

 

The club's visual identity was updated to include a more modern and fashionable badge after it was redesigned in 2017. On the left side of a blue and white basketball with a tiny green star in the center is a gray and navy wolf. The round, dark blue frame of the emblem is written the white lettering in a sans-serif font that is both easy to read and exudes self-assurance.



How is the Minnesota Timberwolves' Uniform?

The Minnesota Timberwolves wear jerseys and shorts that are predominantly royal blue with white lettering and accents. The team's name (WOLVES)  is prominently displayed on the front of both the jersey and shorts, and features a creative font.

What are the Minnesota Timberwolves' Colors?

The Minnesota Timberwolves' colors are midnight blue, lake blue, moonlight grey, and aurora green.

 

The Minnesota Timberwolves team colors in Hex, RGB, and CMYK can be found below:



Color Name

RGB Color Code

CMYK Color Code

Pantone Color Code

HEX Color Code

Midnight Blue

12 35 64

100 76 12 70

PMS 289 C

#0c2340

Aurora Green

120 190 32

65 0 100 0

PMS 368 C

#78be20

Lake Blue

35 97 146

96 54 5 27

PMS 647 C

#236192

Moonlight Grey

158 162 162

19 12 13 34

PMS 422 C

#9ea2a2

Who are the Minnesota Timberwolves Players?

The Minnesota Players consist of Patrick Beverley, D'Angelo Russell, Anthony Edwards, and Jarred Vanderbilt. The Timberwolves are still experimenting with their young starting lineup to find the best combination. 

 

Karl-Anthony Towns and Anthony Edwards are two of the franchise's most promising young players. Both have been the primary contributors in scoring for this starting lineup, with D'Angelo Russell coming in second. The "Big 3" in Minnesota is finally on its way to securing a spot in the playoffs, and they have earned it. 

 

Jarred Vanderbilt and Patrick Beverley are two examples of important role players contributing significantly to the 2021/22 campaign. 

 

Here you can find the starting lineups that have been projected and confirmed for the Timberwolves:

 

 

STARTER

2ND

3RD

4TH

5TH

PG

Patrick Beverley

Jordan McLaughlin

D'Angelo Russell

Jaylen Nowell

Leandro Bolmaro

SG

D'Angelo Russell

Malik Beasley

Jaylen Nowell

Anthony Edwards

Leandro Bolmaro

SF

Anthony Edwards

Taurean Prince

Jaden McDaniels

Josh Okogie

Jake Layman

PF

Jarred Vanderbilt

Jaden McDaniels

Taurean Prince

Naz Reid

Jake Layman

C

Karl-Anthony Towns DD

Naz Reid

Nathan Knight

Greg Monroe

Jarred Vanderbilt



D'Angelo Russell has had a turbulent start to his career in the National Basketball Association (N.B.A.) through his first six seasons in the league. He began his N.B.A. career with the Los Angeles Lakers, then moved on to the Brooklyn Nets, spent time with the Golden State Warriors, and is now playing for the Minnesota Timberwolves. 

 

Since the start of the 2018-19 season, Russell has posted 21.1 points, 6.5 assists, and 3.6 rebounds per game on 47 percent shooting from the field. Russell and KAT have excellent synergy, and they will succeed even if Minnesota isn't very successful as a whole because of their excellent rapport and chemistry together.

 

Anthony Edwards, who was selected first overall in the N.B.A. Draft in 2020 and is now entering his second season, had an outstanding performance in his rookie year. Edwards finished the previous season with averages of 19.3 points, 4.7 rebounds, and 2.9 assists, and all indications point to a meteoric rise for him this season. 

 

According to rumors, Edwards has reached a height of 6 feet 6 inches, which is terrifying for a player who possesses such freakish athleticism. If Edwards can slightly improve his shooting efficiency from both inside and outside the three-point line, he should be able to take that significant next step and establish himself as a star in this league. 

 

Karl-Anthony Towns has been Minnesota's starting center since he was selected, and he had a great track record of avoiding injuries. However, in the last two seasons, he has missed time due to injury. He was only absent from the field five times total during his first four seasons. 

 

After being selected in the draft, it did not take K.A.T. very long to establish himself as the team's most dangerous offensive threat. He finished the season with an average of 24.8 points, 4.5 assists, and 10.6 rebounds, and it appears that he will only improve upon those numbers in the upcoming season. KAT will, without a doubt, be Minnesota's first option on offense, but he will have to demonstrate that he can be a more consistent presence on the defensive end of the court.

How did Glen Taylor's Ownership Affect the Minnesota Timberwolves?

Glen Allen Taylor is a politician and business magnate from Minnesota worth a billion dollars. He was born on April 20, 1941, in the United States. Taylor is a self-made businessman who amassed his fortune as the founder and owner of Taylor Corporation, located in Minnesota, and is one of the most successful graphic communication companies in the United States.

 

Since he bought the team in 1994, Taylor has held the position of the majority owner of the National Basketball Association team known as the Minnesota Timberwolves.

 

During Taylor's tenure as general manager, the Timberwolves have maintained a reputation for mismanagement in the front office, miserliness, and overall incompetence.

 

Throughout their history, the Timberwolves have had a reputation for being unwilling to make roster investments or build a championship-caliber team. The fact that the Timberwolves have finished 17th in the league in average salary throughout the past 26 seasons is evidence that they are not willing to spend money unless they already have a proven superstar on their roster.

 

The ability of the team and its prospects to attract free agents is one factor that should be considered when deciding between professional basketball. However, the money will not be spent if the desired star is already on the roster.

 

It is impossible to imagine a more successful outcome for the gamble that the Timberwolves made in 1995 when they selected Kevin Garnett in the first round of the NBA draft.

 

Garnett quickly demonstrated his superiority as a defender and established himself as the type of player around whom you should construct your team. He fell in love with the town, but he was basically forced to leave after several unsuccessful years on the basketball court. 

 

Although they qualified for the playoffs in every season from the 1996–1997 season through the 2003–2004 season, the Timberwolves were only victorious in two of their four postseason series. Even though the Timberwolves already had a player who would be inducted into the Hall of Fame when he was in his prime, the decision to bring in new talent came much too late.

 

With Taylor's participation and poor hiring methods, front offices have been accused of causing under-the-table contract agreements, disgraceful drafts (including selecting two point guards before Steph Curry), and having gone through a dozen head coaches in the last ten years.

 

Taylor does not receive nearly enough criticism on a national scale for how poorly he has performed his duties as the owner of the Timberwolves. Having said that, he has been a significant contributor toward maintaining basketball in Minnesota.

 

His initial purchase of the franchise in 1994 prevented the still-young expansion team from dissolving. If that had happened, basketball would have likely been absent from Minnesota for an exceptionally long time. Despite rumors that the owner planned to relocate the team to Las Vegas to get arena renovations (not the most creative threat coming from an owner), there has never been any indication that they would leave Minnesota.

 

How are the Minnesota Timberwolves' last five years?

The table shows the Minnesota Timberwolves’ last five years:

 

Season

Lg

Team

W

L

Playoffs

Coaches

Top WS

2021-22

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves*

46

36

Lost W. Conf. 1st Rnd.

C. Finch (46-36)

K. Towns (10.3)

2020-21

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

23

49

 

R. Saunders (7-24), C. Finch (16-25)

K. Towns (5.4)

2019-20

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

19

45

 

R. Saunders (19-45)

K. Towns (5.1)

2018-19

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

36

46

 

T. Thibodeau (19-21), R. Saunders (17-25)

K. Towns (10.4)

2017-18

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves*

47

35

Lost W. Conf. 1st Rnd.

T. Thibodeau (47-35)

K. Towns (14.0)

2016-17

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

31

51

 

T. Thibodeau (31-51)

K. Towns (12.7)

 

How is the Minnesota Timberwolves' season-by-season record?

The table shows the Minnesota Timberwolves’ season-by-season record:

Season

Lg

Team

W

L

Playoffs

Coaches

Top WS

2021-22

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves*

46

36

Lost W. Conf. 1st Rnd.

C. Finch (46-36)

K. Towns (10.3)

2020-21

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

23

49

 

R. Saunders (7-24), C. Finch (16-25)

K. Towns (5.4)

2019-20

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

19

45

 

R. Saunders (19-45)

K. Towns (5.1)

2018-19

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

36

46

 

T. Thibodeau (19-21), R. Saunders (17-25)

K. Towns (10.4)

2017-18

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves*

47

35

Lost W. Conf. 1st Rnd.

T. Thibodeau (47-35)

K. Towns (14.0)

2016-17

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

31

51

 

T. Thibodeau (31-51)

K. Towns (12.7)

2015-16

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

29

53

 

S. Mitchell (29-53)

K. Towns (8.3)

2014-15

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

16

66

 

F. Saunders (16-66)

G. Dieng (4.9)

2013-14

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

40

42

 

R. Adelman (40-42)

K. Love (14.3)

2012-13

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

31

51

 

R. Adelman (31-51)

N. Pekovic (6.7)

2011-12

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

26

40

 

R. Adelman (26-40)

K. Love (10.0)

2010-11

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

17

65

 

K. Rambis (17-65)

K. Love (11.4)

2009-10

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

15

67

 

K. Rambis (15-67)

K. Love (4.9)

2008-09

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

24

58

 

R. Wittman (4-15), K. McHale (20-43)

K. Love (5.3)

2007-08

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

22

60

 

R. Wittman (22-60)

A. Jefferson (7.7)

2006-07

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

32

50

 

D. Casey (20-20), R. Wittman (12-30)

K. Garnett (10.7)

2005-06

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

33

49

 

D. Casey (33-49)

K. Garnett (14.9)

2004-05

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

44

38

 

F. Saunders (25-26), K. McHale (19-12)

K. Garnett (16.1)

2003-04

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves*

58

24

Lost W. Conf. Finals

F. Saunders (58-24)

K. Garnett (18.3)

2002-03

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves*

51

31

Lost W. Conf. 1st Rnd.

F. Saunders (51-31)

K. Garnett (15.6)

2001-02

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves*

50

32

Lost W. Conf. 1st Rnd.

F. Saunders (50-32)

K. Garnett (12.8)

2000-01

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves*

47

35

Lost W. Conf. 1st Rnd.

F. Saunders (47-35)

K. Garnett (11.8)

1999-00

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves*

50

32

Lost W. Conf. 1st Rnd.

F. Saunders (50-32)

K. Garnett (11.6)

1998-99

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves*

25

25

Lost W. Conf. 1st Rnd.

F. Saunders (25-25)

K. Garnett (5.4)

1997-98

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves*

45

37

Lost W. Conf. 1st Rnd.

F. Saunders (45-37)

K. Garnett (9.6)

Season

Lg

Team

W

L

Playoffs

Coaches

Top WS

1996-97

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves*

40

42

Lost W. Conf. 1st Rnd.

F. Saunders (40-42)

K. Garnett (7.3)

1995-96

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

26

56

 

B. Blair (6-14), F. Saunders (20-42)

T. Gugliotta (5.3)

1994-95

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

21

61

 

B. Blair (21-61)

C. Laettner (6.2)

1993-94

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

20

62

 

S. Lowe (20-62)

M. Williams (5.6)

1992-93

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

19

63

 

J. Rodgers (6-23), S. Lowe (13-40)

M. Williams (7.6)

1991-92

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

15

67

 

J. Rodgers (15-67)

D. West (4.6)

1990-91

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

29

53

 

B. Musselman (29-53)

P. Richardson (5.9)

1989-90

NBA

Minnesota Timberwolves

22

60

 

B. Musselman (22-60)

T. Corbin (6.8)

 

The Minnesota Timberwolves have played for 33 NBA seasons.

Who are the Rivals of the Minnesota Timberwolves?

The San Antonio Spurs is probably the most acceptable rival of the Minnesota Timberwolves.  Choosing the best rival for the Timberwolves is difficult because they don't have a defined adversary.

 

The Spurs were the only team that could defeat the Timberwolves more than once while Minnesota was being eliminated from the playoffs in the first round for seven years in a row, and the Spurs did it twice. It is not an unbelievable premise for the rivalry, but the Spurs turned out to be the most ominous figure in Minnesota's postseason woes.

What Is the Average Cost for Minnesota Timberwolves Tickets?

 

You can find Timberwolves tickets for as low as $10.00, with an average ticket price of around $60.00. The most expensive seats will be in the lower level near the court, while cheaper seats can be found on the upper level of the arena. Fans can also purchase tickets to home games through the Timberwolves website or Ticketmaster.

 

Where to Buy Minnesota Timberwolves Tickets?

 

The first place to look is the team's official website. You can also check websites like Ticketmaster or StubHub for ticket availability. Sometimes, you can also find tickets at the arena box office on game day. If you're looking for the best deals on Timberwolves tickets, it's always best to shop around and compare prices from different sources. There may also be promotional offers or discounts available from time to time, so it's worth keeping an eye out for those as well.

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